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First Thermal and Fluids Engineering Summer Conference

ISSN: 2379-1748
ISBN: 978-1-56700-430-4

NUMERICAL STUDY OF BUOYANCY DRIVEN LIQUID FLOW WITH DISPERSED SOLID PARTICLES

DOI: 10.1615/TFESC1.mph.012864
pages 1965-1981

Timothy Munuhe
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250

Ronghui Ma
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250

Walter M. Duval
Department of Mechanical Engineering Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12181; NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135

Robert W. Hawersaat
NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135

Narsingh B. Singh
Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250


KEY WORDS: two phase flow, paticle density ratio, buoyancy driven flow, dispersed sold particle

Abstract

The buoyancy-driven flow behavior of a lead-tin solution with immiscible tin particles in a rectangular container during a cooling process under both normal and microgravity conditions is studied using an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The continuum phase is simulated using the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, and the motion of the particles dispersed in the liquid phase is predicted using the Lagrangian method where the trajectory of each particle is calculated based on Newton's second law of motion considering drag, buoyancy, Saffman lift, and the thermophoresis force. The effects of the dispersed particles on the fluid flow and heat transfer of the continuum phase are considered as volumetric body forces and heat sources, respectively. The simulation results show that heat transfer during the cooling process is dominated by heat conduction and the presence of the dispersed particle with a volume concentration of 15% does not have an appreciable influence on the temperature distribution. However, the behavior of the multiphase flow is very sensitive to the density ratio of tin particles to the lead-tin solution and the particle size. The upward sedimentation of the tin particles may lead to a flow pattern different from that of single liquid phase flow. However, the flow pattern with neutrally buoyant particles remains the same as the flow pattern for single-phase liquid flow, except with lower velocity magnitudes. Under microgravity, the motion of the particles and fluid is determined by the thermophoresis force. The effect of other parameters such as particle size is also presented.

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